Here is what an Italian barbershop looks like.  A lot lie the ones I remember when I was a kid. (Click the photo to see a larger version)

Haircut in Perugia, Italy

As it tends to do, Isaak and my hair grew to a point we looked like a couple rag mops.  It was time to embrace another painful yet ultimately satisfying Italian experience.  I actually hate getting my hair cut.  I despise it.  I don’t know what it is about it.  Maybe the 20 minutes of meaningless small talk or the fact that it just seems like a waste of time.

It was kinda nice actually that Franco didn’t speak any English.  All I had to do was sit there and let him work his magic.  No clippers here.  The whole haircut was done with scissors.  So with no scissors, how did he get all the hairs on the back of my neck you ask.  Well you did… ask… so I will tell you.  A straight edge razor.  I was a little concerned.  No one ever used a straight edge razor on my bare skin like that.  Sure enough, like the hair ninja he was, he lathered me up and sliced the hair away until it was smooth as a baboons butt (I can guess Stacy’s comments already).  I couldn’t resist rubbing the back of my neck for the rest of day.  Franco truly lives by the motto, if you don’t look good… Franco don’t look good.

One thing I’ve noticed and come to love here in Italy is the quality of workmanship and service.  Maybe it’s just the way it was before Fantastic Sams and Wal-marts.  People simply offer you their very best every place you go.  For instance, we visited a wine shop here in Perugla to buy a bottle of vino for a dinner invite and asked for the owners suggestion.  His face lit up while explaining to us with a bubbly sort of passion all the different wines from all the various regions making suggestions all along the way.

One thing that almost gives me goosebumps is listening to shop owners who speak just enough English so you can understand the gist of the conversation and move in and out of Italian as they speak.  The more passionate they become, the more Italian they use.  It’s such a wonderful experience to have complete conversations in this English/Italian melody of language.  Italian is such a beautiful, articulate language.

Here’s some pictures of haircut experience!

Here is what an Italian barbershop looks like.  A lot lie the ones I remember when I was a kid. (Click the photo to see a larger version)

Here is what an Italian barbershop looks like. A lot like the ones I remember when I was a kid. (Click the photo to see a larger version)

The outside of Franco's Acconciature (hairstyles) or Corso G. Garibaldi which is on the same street as our apartment.

The outside of Franco’s Acconciature (hairstyles) or Corso G. Garibaldi which is on the same street as our apartment.

Franco's sign.

Franco’s sign.

In between customers you'll see Franco working away on these walking sticks.  They are all hand carved and very neat.

In between customers you’ll see Franco working away on these walking sticks. They are all hand carved and very neat.

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I'm a tinkerer from a long line of tinkerers who loves finding new ways to combine my passions into new and better experiences. I'm forever dreaming up new ideas and new ways of doing things with a technological bent. I'm an introvert at heart so "getting out and meeting new people" is a bit uncomfortable for me but I'm pushing through it. I love learning new new things and sharing them with people. Perhaps in another life I would of enjoyed being a teacher.

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About Tim

I'm a tinkerer from a long line of tinkerers who loves finding new ways to combine my passions into new and better experiences. I'm forever dreaming up new ideas and new ways of doing things with a technological bent. I'm an introvert at heart so "getting out and meeting new people" is a bit uncomfortable for me but I'm pushing through it. I love learning new new things and sharing them with people. Perhaps in another life I would of enjoyed being a teacher.